Less over-complicating, more doing.

July 23, 2012 Leave a comment

While it is important to constantly re-evaluate where you are and what you should be doing to move forward, don’t overwhelm yourself by constantly trying to design and carry out the “perfect routine”. Such worrying will leave you with the impression that if you aren’t doing something that has been meticulously tailored to produce maximum efficiency, then it isn’t worth doing. You will actually end up doing less, dismissing doing X or Y as “not optimal and therefore shouldn’t be done”. We cannot always be doing what is most rigorous.

You’ll come to realize that, doing what is most “optimal” is usually also the most taxing on your concentration and over-use of such routines could easily lead to burnout. It is better to do a whole lot of something, anything really, as opposed to short concentrated spurts of awesome. Even ignoring that i+1 concept that you’ve been longing to digest and running through familiar routines is still a step in the right direction. It is the lack of doing that will set you back, like trying to boil water but constantly turning off the heat.

You don’t have to cycle 4-finger tapping min7b5 arpeggios up and down the fretboard through the circle of 5ths on two guitars while simultaneously trying to tune a piano with your pinky toe to be productive. Relax and play through some modes, or just one, in a single position, or on a single string. Develop some well-trodden neural pathways. Take your fingers for a little walk.

If you are constantly trying to leap, you are setting yourself up for burnout.
Consistent hopping or even crawling is orders of magnitude more “efficient” than the sporadic and dogmatic adherence to over-complicated utopian fretboard marathons.

Leap where you can and when it is painless to do so, but make sure you are crawling in between. Kick, kick, coast.

Advertisements
Tags:

Fingerpicking ideas

July 23, 2012 Leave a comment

Some fingerpicking ideas. Chords presented in order of convenience, not in the order in which they should be played.

Mostly fingerpicking each string individually with some two-finger squeezing on 1&6 and 2&5, emphasis on open high and low E strings to ring out when plucked. Some tapping between transitions.

Add some hammers and pull-offs on strings 5, 2, and 1.

3-finger trem picking on high E.

Pretty disorganized for now.

E|–0—0—0—2—0–
B|–3—0—3—3—3–
G|–4—4—0—0—0–
D|–2—2—4—4—4–
A|–3—3—2—2—2–
E|–0—0—0—0—3–

E|–2—3—0–
B|–0—0—3–
G|–2—2—0–
D|–1—1—2–
A|–2—2—1–
E|–0—0—0–

E|——————7——–
B|—3—5—7—7—10—
G|—3—5—7—9—7—-
D|—2—3—5—9—9—-
A|—3—5—7—7—9—-
E|——————8——–

E|—2—-7—-
B|—3—-8—-
G|—4—-9—-
D|—5—-10—
A|—————
E|—————

E|—10—7—–7——7—7—5—3—2—2—
B|—0—–0—-10—–5—5—3—3—0—3—
G|—9—–9—–9——7—7—0—0—0—4—
D|—10—10—10—-5—4——————5—
A|——————————————————-
E|——————————————————-

Tags:

Epiphany #4

June 26, 2012 Leave a comment

While it is certainly a useful and interesting exercise, constructing chords is like scaffolding.
You should be able to make a Cmaj9 chord on the spot, not because the 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th, and 9th notes are arranged a particular way, but simply because it is a Cmaj9 chord. Your fingers are forming that shape on the fretboard because that shape is where Cmaj9 lives. He hangs out there, it is his personal place in the universe. You can visit him anytime, because he will always be there.

Try thinking about constructing chords and “seeing” chord shapes within scales, as a means to stop seeing them.

音出して

June 23, 2012 Leave a comment

「うまくなくてもいいし、間違ってもいいのよ。」

「まずは音だして」

「音出さなきゃ音楽始まらないのよ」

Harmony Explained: Progress Towards A Scientific Theory of Music

June 21, 2012 1 comment

The Major Scale, The Standard Chord Dictionary, and The Difference of Feeling Between The Major and Minor Triads Explained from the First Principles of Physics and Computation; The Theory of Helmholtz Shown To Be Incomplete and The Theory of Terhardt and Some Others Considered

http://arxiv.org/html/1202.4212v1

Tags:

Workout 0.21

June 21, 2012 Leave a comment

A workout modified specifically for learning note positions, as well as the four main Major and Minor triad shapes in multiple keys.
The same exercises are repeated for notes C, A, G, and E

Using http://nowdothis.com and pasting the following:

1) Play C note on each string
2) Play C notes on entire fretboard according to octave patterns
3) Play the four C Major triads by root note of string in ascending fashion
4) Play the four C Minor triads by root note of string in ascending fashion
1) Play A note on each string
2) Play A notes on entire fretboard according to octave patterns
3) Play the four A Major triads by root note of string in ascending fashion
4) Play the four A Minor triads by root note of string in ascending fashion
1) Play G note on each string
2) Play G notes on entire fretboard according to octave patterns
3) Play the four G Major triads by root note of string in ascending fashion
4) Play the four G Minor triads by root note of string in ascending fashion
1) Play E note on each string
2) Play E notes on entire fretboard according to octave patterns
3) Play the four E Major triads by root note of string in ascending fashion
4) Play the four E Minor triads by root note of string in ascending fashion

Major and Minor Triads

June 20, 2012 Leave a comment

Learning to produce any given chord in any given position effortlessly and fluidly is quite an undertaking, and I don’t think it should be something approached from a top-down perspective. If it were, I think it would be a rather painful endeavor, with grandiose expectations and unclear deadlines for success.

So, I’m going to begin in piece-meal fashion.

First, I will learn the four basic triads in every key. To go about this, I think it makes sense to start with the root note on each of the lower 4 strings (E, A, D, G). Four root note positions of a given key.
These four shapes are easily accessible across the neck and could be worked into a fretboard-note exercise quite well. It should be strongly noted that while the first two shapes (E & A strings) are exactly the same shape, the high two (D and G) change in consequence of the odd tuning between G and B strings. Learning the triads in this manner really allows you to visualize this shift.

From there, as the degree notes of each of the four triad shapes progress linearly (1, 3, 5) up the neck, the third can be easily flattened to produce minor triads. So by learning 3 shapes (same shape on E & A), we can effectively learn to readily produce four major and minor triads for any given key in four different positions.

After thoroughly digesting this, we can move on to incorporating 7th notes, and experiment with doubling our notes to produce different voicings.

Of course, it always helps to learn the same thing many different ways, so it would also be useful to learn triads within the basic CAGED shapes and how to alter them to create Min, Maj7, Min7, D7, Aug, Aug7, etc. from them.